Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Aaron MENDENHALL "I"

1.  Aaron died during the collapse of a shed at a coal mine.

2.  An absract of his will follows:  
To son James - 100 acres off east end of my tract, smith tools.
To son Moses - 100 acres off west end of my tract.
To wife Miriam - hoouse and rest of land to support children.
To daughters Dinah, Miriam and Charity - equal shares of moveable estate.
Executors - wife and Bethuel Coffin.


Aaron E. MILLS

1.  Aaron & his family moved several times from Jefferson County, Tennessee to North Carolina to Indiana in th 1830 and Oregon in 1843 with the first immigration of Dr. Marcus Whitman and his group.

2.  Aaron was thought to be one of the stoutest men of his time.


Isaac M. MENDENHALL

1.  Following is an abstract of Isaac's will:
To wife - 160 acres, stock and farming tools.
To sons Jacob  and Miles - proceeds of sale of land after wife's decease.
To children Ruth Carter, Isaac, Aaron,Zadoc and Mordecai - $1 each having already provided for them.
Executor - son, Mordecai.


Isaac M. MENDENHALL

1.  Following is an abstract of Isaac's will:
To wife - 160 acres, stock and farming tools.
To sons Jacob  and Miles - proceeds of sale of land after wife's decease.
To children Ruth Carter, Isaac, Aaron,Zadoc and Mordecai - $1 each having already provided for them.
Executor - son, Mordecai.


Mordecai MENDENHALL "Sr"

1.  Mordecai moved to Frederick County, Virginia in Sep 1736 after marrhing Charity Beeson.

2.  In 1751 they moved to New Garden, North Carolina, then to Deep River, and finally to Springfield.

3.  He acquired hundred of acres of land along Deep River.  

4.  During the Revolutionary War, Mordecai furnished quarters, food and horses for the American Army and his home was used as a temporary hospital for the wounded.  

5.  On one occasion Mordecai earned the displeasure of the Quakers when he used abusive and unbecoming language to a fellow Quaker after the conclusion of a religious meeting.  Mordecai subsequently apologized to the Quakers and his apology was accepted.

6:  Mordecai left the following will:

    I, Mordecai Mendenhall, of Guilford County and state of North Carolina being in sound in mind and memory do make this my last will and testament in the manner and ofrm following:
    I lend unto my loving wife Charity Mendenhall the plantation that I now live on during her life also my personal estate except what I hereafter order otherwise.
    I give unto my son Richard Mendenhall, heirs five shillings.  
     I give unto my son, Thomas Mendenhall, heirs five shillings.
    I give unto my daughter, Charity Mills, five shillings.
    I give unto my son, Isaac Mendenhall, the plantation that I now live on containing three hundred and thirty two acres at the decease of my wife to him, his heirs and assigns forever.
    I give unto my son, Isaac my smith tools.
    I give my money and notes of hand unto my four sons Moses, Stephen, Mordecai and Isaac Mendenhall and at the decease of their mother all the remainder of my personal estate to be equally divided amongst them.
    I do hereby appoint my sons, Stephen and Isaac Mendenhall, excutors to this my last will and testament.
     Ratifying this to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this night day of the first month in the yer of our Lord one thousand seven hundred ninty six.
                          Mordecai Mendenhall (signed and sealed)


Richard MENDENHALL "I"

1.  Richard was part of a scouting party led by James Boone, son of Daniel, which was ambushed by Indians at Wallens Creek, Virginia.  During the Revolution, Daniel Boone made arrangements to sell what property he could not move with him and persuaded some of his wife's family, the Bryans, to join him on a trip to claim new land in Kentucky.  He was joined by his brother, Squire, Squire's wife, Jane, and their three children, along with Benjamin Cutbeard and his wife, who was a niece of Daniel's, making a total of five or six families, along with about 40 men  who each had a horse or two to help carry all the supplies.  Among these 40 men were John and Richard Mendenhall.  Richard was 36 years of age and John, a first cousin, was 25.

2.  The party left the Yadkin on 25 Sep 1773.  Travel was slow as the trail was only wide enough for the pack horses, walking single file and all who were able bodied had to walk.  When they reached Wolf Hills, Now Abingdon, Virginia, Daniel sent his seventeen year old son James along with John and Richard Mendenhall to go to Castle Woods, which was off the trail to the north about 25 miles.  They were to pick up supplies and meet the main party further west.  The main party would follow the old wilderness trail, through Moccasin Gap, over Wallens Ridge at a point about 10 miles east of the Cumberland Gap, where they would make camp and leave the women and children to rest until James and the Mendenhall party overtook them.  They feared that if the Indians would attack it would be in that area and for protection they wanted the part to be together.

3.  Russell, the seventeen year old son of Captain Russell, a man by the name of Isaac Crabtree and two Negro slaves named Charles and Adam, joined James Boone, Richard, & John Mendenhall to help out with the supplies and farm tools.  Captain Russell himself said he would follow along later as he had some necessary work to do at home before leaving.  He would join David Gass who lived eight miles down the Clinch River.

4.  James Boone and the Mendenhall party set out on 8 Oct 1773, following the old Fincastle Trail down past David Gass's place and crossed Clinch Riner at Hunters Ford, Now Dungannon.  From that point they passed through Rye Cove and took the Wilderness Trail over Powell Mountain to the head water of Wallens Creek.

5.  James and his companions could see signs, probably made by his father's party and he knew that the place of rendezvous was but a few miles ahead.  However, darkness overtook them and fearing they might lose their way, they set up camp the evening of 9 Oct.   Early in the morning of the 10th, Indians rushed up with knife blades raised and guns cracking.  A man by the name of Drake and Richard Mendenhall were killed out right.  James Mendenhall crept off mortally wounded.  He had been attacked by a big Indian who he knew to be Big Jim, a Shawnee, who had roamed the Yadkin Country and had pretended to be a friend of his father.  Henry Russell was shot through the hips and broght down.  All in the party were killed except Isaac Crabtree and the two Negroe slaves, Adam and Charles.